Answer A is Incorrect, Try Again


Answer B is Incorrect, Try Again


Answer C is Incorrect, Try Again


Answer A is correct. FAA-H-8083-25 Pilotís Handbook of Aeronautical Knowledge, Page 12-13
Landing behind a larger aircraft on the same runway - stay at or above the larger aircraft's approach flightpath and land beyond its touchdown point.

Answer C is correct. FAA-H-8083-25 Pilotís Handbook of Aeronautical Knowledge, Page 12-13
The greatest vortex strength occurs when the generating aircraft is heavy, clean, and slow.

Answer C is correct. FAA-H-8083-25 Pilotís Handbook of Aeronautical Knowledge, Page 12-13
Tests have also shown that the vortices sink at a rate of several hundred feet per minute.

Answer C is correct. FAA-H-8083-25 Pilotís Handbook of Aeronautical Knowledge, Page 12-13
Vortices are generated from the moment aircraft leave the ground, since trailing vortices are a by-product of wing lift.

Answer B is correct. Aeronautical Information Manual, Section 7-3-4(b)
A light wind with a cross runway component of 1 to 5 knots could result in the upwind vortex remaining in the touchdown zone ... and hasten the drift of the downwind vortex toward another runway. A tailwind condition can move the vortices ... into the touchdown zone. THE LIGHT QUARTERING TAILWIND REQUIRES MAXIMUM CAUTION.

Answer C is correct. AIM Aeronautical Information Manual, Paragraph 8-1-5(b)(3)(e)
Rain on the windscreen can create the illusion of greater height, and atmospheric haze the illusion of being at a greater distance from the runway.

Answer A is correct. Soaring Flight Manual, Page 14-11
The calm wind approach speed is usually equal to 1-1/2 times the stall speed. One half of the estimated wind speed is added to compensate for the tendency to lose airspeed as wind velocity decreases near the surface.

Answer C is correct. Soaring Flight Manual, Page 14-15
Should the sailplane balloon, the dive brakes should be closed and a new landing initiated. The sailplane will continue to float in ground effect after the flare. The dive brakes or spoilers should be partially opened, while maintaining a slight nose-high pitch attitude.

Answer B is correct. FAA-H-8083-13 Glider Flying Handbook, Page 8-8
If the terrain below is suitable for landing, select a general area no lower than 2,000 feet AGL. Select the intended landing field no lower than 1,500 feet AGL.

Answer C is correct. AIM Aeronautical Information Manual, Paragraph 7-3-7
In forward flight, departing or landing helicopters produce a pair of strong, high-speed trailing vortices similar to wing tip vortices of larger fixed wing aircraft.

Answer A is correct. AIM Aeronautical Information Manual, Paragraph 7-3-6(b)(1)
Landing behind a larger aircraft - same runway: Stay at or above the larger aircraft's final approach flight path - note its touchdown point - land beyond it.

Answer A is correct. AIM Aeronautical Information Manual, Paragraph 7-3-6(b)(9)
Avoid flight below and behind a large aircraft's path.

Answer A is correct. Joy of Soaring, Page 108
A pilot on final approach enters an area of lower headwind, perhaps as much as 10 to 15 mph less than he had a few seconds earlier. The glider sinks because the airflow across the wing is less than it was. Sinking increases the angle of attack; the wing may stall just where there isn't enough altitude for recovery.

Answer B is correct. Joy of Soaring, Page 110
When the pilot sees swirling dust, leaves or debris ahead, he has warning and should take instant action. He should close the spoilers and dive close to the ground to pick up airspeed. As soon as he is over the fence he should touch down at whatever airspeed, and while rolling try to stay out of the thermal.

Answer B is correct. FAA-H-8083-13 Glider Flying Handbook, Page 8-9
If level landing areas are not available and the landing must be made on a slope, it is better to land uphill than downhill.

Answer B is correct. AC 61-23 Pilotís Handbook of Aeronautical Knowledge, Page 4-16
From where the wind angle line and wind velocity line intersect, draw a straight line across the chart to determine the headwind component and draw a straight line down the chart to determine the crosswind component.

Answer A is correct. FAA-H-8083-3 Airplane Flying Handbook, Page 6-4
Since drift correction was held on the base leg, it is necessary to turn less than 90o to align the airplane parallel to the upwind leg. (Similarly the turn from upwind to crosswind requires less than 90o.)

Answer C is correct. FAA-H-8083-3 Airplane Flying Handbook, Page 7-6
If the pilot attempts to focus on a reference that is too close or looks directly down, the reference will become blurred, and the reaction will be either too abrupt or too late. In this case, the pilot's tendency will be to overcontrol, roundout high, and make full-stall drop-in landings. When the pilot focuses too far ahead, accuracy in judging the closeness of the ground is lost and the consequent reaction will be too slow since there will not appear to be a necessity for action, this will result in the airplane flying into the ground, nose first.

Answer A is correct. FAA-H-8083-3 Airplane Flying Handbook, Page 8-6
The most effective method to prevent drift in primary training aircraft is the wing-low method. This technique keeps the longitudinal axis of the airplane aligned with both the runway and the direction of motion throughout the approach and touchdown.

Answer B is correct. FAA-H-8083-3 Airplane Flying Handbook, Page 8-2
If the airspeed on final approach is excessive, it will usually result in the airplane floating.

Answer B is correct. FAA-H-8083-3 Airplane Flying Handbook, Page 12-4
The direction and speed of the wind are important factors during any landing, particularly in an emergency landing, since wind affects the airplane's gliding distance over the ground, the path over the ground during approach, the groundspeed at which the airplane contacts the ground, and the distance the airplane rolls after the landing.

Answer C is correct. AIM Aeronautical Information Manual, Paragraph 8-1-5(b)(3)(e)
Rain on the windscreen can create the illusion of greater height, and atmospheric haze the illusion of being at a greater distance from the runway.


© 2005 Jim D. Burch 602-942-2734 jdburch@att.net